Jewelant Antique Postcards 57-64

A sixth pile of antique postcards . . . And that’s not ALL I’ll scan some more later on.

Antique Card – Lovelights Quit Your Foolin' Man and woman card with them in the middle framed by a lightbulb and a heart shape.

Antique Card – Lovelights Quit Your Foolin’ Man and woman card with them in the middle framed by a lightbulb and a heart shape.

Antique Travel Folding Postcard THE EIFFEL TOWER

Antique Travel Folding Postcard THE EIFFEL TOWER

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Edgewater Gulf Hotel 1937

Antique Travel Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Edgewater Gulf Hotel 1937

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Buena Vista Motel 1937

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Buena Vista Motel 1937

Antique Travel Postcard Missouri Stevens College Administration Building Columbia 1938

Antique Travel Postcard Missouri Stevens College Administration Building Columbia 1938

Antique Travel Postcard Carlos Hotel Pensacola Florida 1935

Antique Travel Postcard Florida San Antique Travel Postcard Carlos Hotel Pensacola Florida 1935

Antique Travel Postcard Swimming Pool Bath House Syracuse NY 1939

Antique Travel Postcard Swimming Pool Bath House Syracuse NY 1939

Antique Travel Postcard Arkansas Hot Springs Mountain Drive 1914

Antique Travel Postcard Arkansas Hot Springs Mountain Drive 1914

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jewelant Antique Postcards 46-56

A fifth big bunch of antique postcards . . . They did a lot of travel art back then.

Antique Travel Postcard – Colorado Pikes Peak Trifold Vacation

Antique Travel Postcard – Colorado Pikes Peak Trifold Vacation This has multiple photos inside.

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Biloxi Historic Lighthouse 1941

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Biloxi Historic Lighthouse 1941

Antique Travel Postcard Hotel Markham Gulfport Mississippi 1942

Antique Travel Postcard Hotel Markham Gulfport Mississippi 1942

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Georgia Lookout Mountain Rock city gardens 1938

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Georgia Lookout Mountain Rock city gardens 1938

Antique Travel Postcard EastBeachRiverDriveSunset on the Mississippi River 1936-1940

Antique Travel Postcard EastBeachRiverDriveSunset on the Mississippi River 1936-1940

Antique Travel Postcard Holly Springs, MS Mississippi Synodical College in winter 1936-40

Antique Travel Postcard Holly Springs, MS Mississippi Synodical College in winter 1936-40

Antique Travel Postcard Tennessee Memphis Harahan Bridge 1938-1940

Antique Travel Postcard Tennessee Memphis Harahan Bridge 1938-1940

Antique Travel Postcard – Birch Trees And Canoe 1936 Publisher: Curteich Postmark: July 6,1936 Notes: Writing on back, one cent green stamp

Antique Travel Postcard – Birch Trees And Canoe 1936 Publisher: Curteich Postmark: July 6,1936 Notes: Writing on back, one cent green stamp

Antique Travel Postcard Peace River Florida A Scene near Arcadia Fla 1936

Antique Travel Postcard Peace River Florida A Scene near Arcadia Fla 1936

Antique Travel Postcard Florida New Smyrna Yacht Club

Antique Travel Postcard Florida New Smyrna Yacht Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jewelant Antique Postcards 35-45

A fourth batch of antique postcards . . .

Antique Travel Postcard California Venice California vacation beach trifold fold out one picture from

Antique Travel Postcard California Venice California vacation beach trifold fold out one picture from

Antique Postcard An alluring Scene Down South 1939

Antique Travel Postcard An alluring Scene Down South 1939

Antique Travel Postcard – Georgia Atlanta Georgia Druid Hill Golf Course 1931

Antique Travel Postcard Georgia Atlanta Georgia Druid Hill Golf Course 1931

Antique Travel Postcard South Carolina A walk in Middleton Gardens Charleston South Carolina 1942

Antique Travel Postcard South Carolina A walk in Middleton Gardens Charleston South Carolina 1942

Antique Travel Postcard – New Jersey Bathing Beach Looking South From Ocean Pier, Wildwood-By-The-Sea NJ 1942

Antique Travel Postcard New Jersey Bathing Beach Looking South From Ocean Pier, Wildwood-By-The-Sea NJ 1942

Antique Travel Postcard St Augustine Florida Hotel Ponce DeLeon 1943

Antique Travel Postcard St Augustine Florida Hotel Ponce DeLeon 1943

Antique Travel Postcard – Mississippi Vivid Azaleas along the Mississippi Gulf Coast

Antique Travel Postcard Mississippi Vivid Azaleas along the Mississippi Gulf Coast

Antique Travel Postcard – Wyoming Wind River Canyon Wyoming 1072 Highway through wind river canon on US 20 near thermopolis

Antique Travel Postcard Wyoming Wind River Canyon Wyoming 1072 Highway through wind river canon on US 20 near Thermopolis Wyoming

Antique Military Postcard King George era World War One Tanks 1916-1917

Antique Military Postcard King George era World War One Tanks 1916-1917

Antique Postcard Canada Parliament Buildings Ottowa Canada 1939

Antique Postcard Canada Parliament Buildings Ottowa Canada 1939

Antique Travel Postcard – Texas State Capitol Austin Texas 1939

Antique Travel Postcard – Texas State Capitol Austin Texas 1939

 

 

 

Jewelant Antique Postcards 24-34

A third batch of antique postcards . . .

Antique Postcard of texas state capitol austin tx 1939

Antique Scenic Postcard Texas state capitol Austin 1939

Antique Scenic Postcard louisiana fort pike and rigolets bridge new orleans 1939

Antique Scenic Postcard louisiana fort pike and rigolets bridge new orleans 1939

Antique Scenic Postcard louisiana new orleans huey p long bridge 1938

Antique Scenic Postcard louisiana new orleans huey p long bridge 1938

Antique Scenic Postcard colorado valley of dreams cave of the winds colorado springs 1937

Antique Scenic Postcard colorado valley of dreams cave of the winds colorado springs 1937

Antique Military Postcard alabama montgomery maxwell field 1941

Antique Military Postcard alabama montgomery maxwell field 1941

Antique Scenic Postcard mississippi gulf side bilioxi 1938

Antique Scenic Postcard mississippi gulf side bilioxi 1938

Antique PostcardTexasNight View, State of Texas Building, Texas Centennial Exposition, Dallas 1936

Antique PostcardTexasNight View, State of Texas Building, Texas Centennial Exposition, Dallas 1936

Antique Scenic Postcard mississippi pines along the mississippi gulf coast between-biloxi and gulfport 1937

Antique Scenic Postcard mississippi pines along the mississippi gulf coast between-biloxi and gulfport 1937

Antique Postcard tennessee memphis arial view business district 1941

Antique Postcard tennessee memphis arial view business district 1941

Antique Postcard colorado denver business buildings trifold

Antique Postcard colorado denver business buildings trifold

Antique Tri-Fold Folding Postcard colorado denver scenes along the moffat road outside view

Antique Tri-Fold Folding Postcard colorado denver scenes along the moffat road outside view

 

 

 

Jewelant Antique Postcards 15-24

A second batch of antique postcards . . .

Antique Postcard B25 Bomber World War One 1942

Antique Postcard B25 Bomber World War One 1942

Antique Postcard Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1959

Antique Postcard Royal Canadian Mounted Police 1959

Antique Postcard Old Black Man down south 1942

Antique Postcard Old Black Man down south 1942

Antique Postcard oklahoma indian scout henryetta1941

Antique Postcard oklahoma indian scout henryetta 1941

Antique Postcard Hot Springs Arkansas Boy Riding Alligator

Antique Postcard Hot Springs Arkansas Boy Riding Alligator

Antique Postcard Girl Riding A Turtle Biloxie Mississippi 1936

Antique Postcard Girl Riding A Turtle Biloxie Mississippi 1936

Antique Postcard Emil Ritters Midgets 1930

Antique Postcard Emil Ritters Midgets 1930

Antique Art Postcard by Israels The Woman Knitting not dated

Antique Art Postcard by Israels The Girl Knitting.  not dated

Antique Postcard south carolina scene in magnolia gardensc Charleston SC 1942

Antique Postcard south carolina “scene in magnolia garden” Charleston SC 1942

Antique Postcard louisiana canal street by night new orleans Louisiana1939

Antique Postcard louisiana canal street by night new orleans Louisiana1939

 

 

 

Jewelant Antique Postcards 1-14

These antiques aren’t expensive at all.  And they don’t take up any more space than a photo.

Antique postcard "Dangerous Curves Ahead" 1941 World War Two Era

Antique postcard “Dangerous Curves Ahead” 1941 World War Two Era

Antique travel beach postcard 1941

Antique humorous travel beach postcard 1941

Antique postcard postmarked 1940 close to World War Two

Antique postcard postmarked 1940 close to World War Two

Antique Postcard "Window Shopping" postmarked 1940

Antique Postcard “Window Shopping” postmarked 1940

Antique postcard of goat butting a man

Antique postcard of goat butting a man

Antique postcard Nudist Colony 1939

Antique postcard Nudist Colony 1939

Antique World War Two Military Postcard 1942

Antique World War Two Military Postcard 1942

Antique Postcard Girl and Goat

Antique Postcard Girl and Goat

https://jewelant.files.wordpress.com/2016/02/crd-010-ratherbeachickencartoonpostcard.jpg?w=470

Antique World War Two Military postcard

Antique Funny Outhouse Postcard Curteich cards

Antique Funny Outhouse Postcard Curteich cards

Antique funny cartoon postcard 1943

Antique funny cartoon postcard 1943

Have a Happy Easter Antique Postcard 1940

Have a Happy Easter Antique Postcard 1940

Antique World War Two Military Postcards Curtis Field Texas 1942

Antique World War Two Military Postcards Curtis Field Texas 1942

Antique Arkansas Hot Springs vacation postcard

Antique Arkansas Hot Springs vacation postcard Ethnographic

Published in: on 2016/02/14 at 7:01 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Jewelant Website Message

Jewelant Antique Postcards

ATTENTION!  IMPORTANT NEWS!
The Jewelant.com and Antiqueheap.com websites are going to be going to be gone Mid February 2016, as a necessary budget cut.   BUT DON’T WORRY!  Jewelant and all the stuff that was here will be online at many other places, so Jewelant will not be gone after all.  I will be posting all that was there, plus more things at these links later this month and throughout the year. Here are most of my links.  And I’ll be posting, as always here on the blogs.

JEWELANT WORDPRESS
ANTIQUE HEAP WORDPRESS
JEWELANT YOUTUBE CHANNEL
JEWELANT AT FACEBOOK
YAHOO FLICKR PHOTOS
JEWELANT PINTEREST PINS
JEWELANT WEBSTORE
GOOGLE PLUS PAGE
GOOGLE WEB SEARCH JEWELANT
GOOGLE IMAGE SEARCH JEWELANT

And don’t forget you can contact me by email at any of those links. In the meantime, here’s some more stuff I’ll be posting:

Antique Military, Militaria

Antique Vinyl Records by Jewelant

Antique books,magazine,paperbacks

Jewlant's antique toys

Antique radio, ham, CB, and tubes

Vintage and Antique Jewelry

But that’s just a few of the things and categories.  I just have a lot of great junk!

 

North American B25 Bomber

I had this postcard and decided to find more information about it.

North American B25 Bomber antique postcard

North American B25 Bomber antique postcard at http://www.jewelant.com

From Wikipedia article North American B-25 Mitchell
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_B-25_Mitchell

The B-25 was named in honor of General Billy Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation.

The B-25 was a descendant of the earlier XB-21 (North American-39) project of the mid-1930s. Experience gained in developing that aircraft was eventually used by North American in designing the B-25 (called the NA-40 by the company).

The majority of B-25s in American service were used in the Pacific. They fought on Papua New Guinea, in Burma and in the island hopping campaign in the central Pacific.

In Burma, the B-25 was often used to attack Japanese communication links, especially bridges in central Burma. It also helped supply the besieged troops at Imphal in 1944.

In the Pacific, the B-25 proved itself to be a very capable anti-shipping weapon, sinking many ships.

The first B-25s arrived in Egypt just in time to take part in the Battle of El Alamein. From there the aircraft took part in the rest of the campaign in North Africa, the invasion of Sicily and the advance up Italy.

The U.S. Eighth Air Force, based in Britain, concentrated on long-range raids over Germany and occupied Europe. During World War Two the British RAF received nearly 900 Mitchells, using them to replace Douglas Bostons, Lockheed Venturas and Vickers Wellington bombers.

Although the B-25 was originally designed to bomb from medium altitudes in level flight, it was used frequently in the Southwest Pacific theatre on treetop-level strafing and missions with parachute-retarded fragmentation bombs against Japanese airfields in New Guinea and the Philippines

The B-25 first gained fame as the bomber used in the 18 April 1942 Doolittle Raid, in which 16 B-25Bs led by Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle attacked mainland Japan, four months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

The Royal Air Force (RAF) was an early customer for the B-25 via Lend-Lease. The RAF was the only force to use the B-25 on raids against Europe from bases in the United Kingdom, as the USAAF used the Martin B-26 Marauder and Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress for this purpose instead.

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) was an important user of the B-25 Mitchell,

The Australians got Mitchells by the spring of 1944.

During World War II, the Mitchell served in fairly large numbers with the Air Force of the Dutch government-in-exile

The U.S. supplied 862 B-25 (of B, D, G, and J types) aircraft to the Soviet Union under lend-lease during the Second World War via the Alaska–Siberia ALSIB ferry route.

Well over 100 B-25Cs and Ds were supplied to the Nationalist Chinese during the Second World War. In addition, a total of 131 B-25Js were supplied to China under Lend-Lease.

During the war, the Força Aérea Brasileira (FAB) received a few B-25s under Lend-Lease.

At least 21 Mitchell IIIs were issued by the Royal Air Force to No 342 Squadron, which was made up primarily of Free French aircrews.

At 9:40 on Saturday, 28 July 1945, a USAAF B-25D crashed in thick fog into the north side of the Empire State Building between the 79th and 80th floors.

There are more than one hundred surviving North American B-25 Mitchells scattered over the world, mainly in the United States. Most of them are on static display in museums, but about 45 are still airworthy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_North_American_B-25_Mitchells
==============
SPECIFICATIONS
Crew: 6 (one pilot, one co-pilot, navigator/bombardier, turret gunner/engineer, radio operator/waist gunner, tail gunner)
Length: 52 ft 11 in (16.13 m)
Wingspan: 67 ft 7 in (20.60 m)
Height: 16 ft 4 in (4.98 m)
Wing area: 610 sq ft (56.7 m²)
Empty weight: 19,480 lb (8,855 kg)
Max. takeoff weight: 35,000 lb (15,910 kg)
Powerplant: 2 × Wright R-2600-92 Twin Cyclone 14-cylinder air-cooled radial engine, 1,700 hp (1,267 kW) each

Performance
Maximum speed: 272 mph (237 kn, 438 km/h) at 13,000 ft (3,960 m)
Cruise speed: 230 mph (200 knots, 370 km/h)
Range: 1,350 mi (1,174 nmi, 2,174 km)
Service ceiling: 24,200 ft (7,378 m)

Armament
Guns: 12–18 × .50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns and 75 mm (2.95 in) T13E1 cannon
Hardpoints: 2,000 lb (900 kg) ventral shackles to hold one external Mark 13 torpedo[35]
Rockets: racks for eight 5 in (127 mm) high velocity aircraft rockets (HVAR)
Bombs: 3,000 lb (1,360 kg) bombs
==========================
List of aircraft of World War II
The List of aircraft of World War II includes all the aircraft used by those countries which were at war during World War II from the period between their joining the conflict and the conflict ending for them.  See this article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_aircraft_of_World_War_II

=========

Note:  jewelant.com has this postcard, and if you like it, it is possible to order a print of it to hang on your wall.  The original was scanned in high resolution, and would make a fine addition to any military collection. Just email jewelant and inquire.

Jewelant Jewelry page 4 – Earrings

Jewelant is at work to create some antique remade jewelry for you.  These were made from antique earrings with no backs, but two of them I made from scratch from antique swarovski crystals that came from very antique necklaces.  The crystal necklaces that didn’t have enough crystals left to restring, so I just tried my hand at making a few earring sets out of them.

Antique Pearl green tear drop earrings

Antique Pearl green tear drop earrings JEW 79

Paypal buy now buttonAntique pearl green teardrop earrings with gold toned french hooks.  Each measures 1 ½’long x 3/8”  #JEW 79  $10.00

Antique peach pearl drop earrings

Antique peach pearl drop earrings JEW 80

Paypal buy now buttonAntique peach pearl dangle earrings with gold toned cage encasement on gold toned french hooks.  Each measures 1 5/8”long x 3/8”  #JEW 80  $10.00

Antique silver filigree drop earrings

Antique silver filigree drop earrings JEW 81

Paypal buy now buttonAntique Silver metal filigreed earrings with silver toned french hooks.  Each measures 1 1 /2”long x 5/8”  #JEW 81  $12.00

Antique Carnelian turtle earrings

Carnelian turtle earrings JEW 82

Paypal buy now buttonAntique carnelian turtle earrings with gold french hooks. Each measures 1 5/8”long x 1/2”wide  #JEW 82  $24.00

Antique gold toned double heart earrings

Antique double heart earrings JEW 83

Paypal buy now buttonDouble gold toned heart dangle earrings with french hooks.  Measurement each 1” x ½”  #JEW 83  $8.00

Antique blue crystal and pearl earrings

Antique blue crystal earrings JEW 84

Paypal buy now buttonHand made sparkling antique blue swarovski crystal and pearl dangle earrings with silver french hooks.  Each measures 1 1/2”long x 1/4”  #JEW 84  $16.00

Handmade antique aurora borealis crystal earrings

Handmade antique aurora borealis crystals JEW 85

Paypal buy now buttonEarrings hand made from antique crystals.  Aurora borealis crystals and faux pearls on gold setting.  Each measures 2”long x 1/4”wide.  #JEW 85  $16.00

Aurora borealis flower earrings

Aurora borealis flower earrings JEW 77

Paypal buy now buttonAurora borealis pink rhinestone flower earrings with post backs. Each measures 1/2”  #JEW 77  $10.00

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NOTE:  If you are ordering more than one item, instead of clicking on the buy now button, contact me by email, because I can ship four items for the same shipping price.  I can just send the invoice by email.  When I figure the shopping cart option things will be much better.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hand painted figurines 3

Jewelant is painting more ceramics before Christmas 2014.

hand painted baby reindeer

Rudolph’s brother

Paypal buy now buttonSmall brown reindeer, green harness, Hand painted ceramic 1  4” long x 4”tall x 2”wide  #CER 40  $5.00

ceramic woven basket with flowers

Fresh for your table

Paypal buy now buttonLarge Pink woven basket with flowers inside, handpainted ceramic.  #CER 19  $16.00

hand painted Ceramic victorian doll

For doll collectors, or just yourself

Paypal buy now buttonFrilly lady doll with pink dress, lace, and gold necklace. Handpainted very tall about 16”  #CER 20  $28.00

hand painted wedding swan

You can put things inside of this swan such as candy or tiny favors

Paypal buy now buttonSwan container with sparkling flowers on neck, Handpainted ceramic  12”long x 8 1/4”tall x 6”wide  #CER 25  $24.00

hand painted ceramic elephant

Baby loves this elephant

Paypal buy now buttonStuffed elephant, Handpainted ceramic 8”long x 6 1/2”wide x 6 3/4”tall.  #CER 08  $24.00

hand painted ceramic container with lid

puffy basket with ruffled lid

Paypal buy now buttonGreen and white and sparkled sewing basket or container with quilting on top and ruffle edged lid, Hand painted ceramic  9”long x 6 1/2”wide x 4”tall  #CER 50  $22.00

large hand painted ceramic teddy bear

A large teddy for the baby room

Paypal buy now buttonLarge brown Stuffed bear, Hand painted ceramic  8 1/2”tall x 10 1/2”wide x 6 1/2”deep.  #CER 43  $22.00

home sweet home wall plaque

Home Sweet Home

Paypal buy now buttonHome Sweet Home ceramic wall hanging with bluebirds in a nest on front, Handpainted ceramic.  About 12” tall.  #CER 21  #12.00

Ceramic cherubs Christmas decoration

For your Christmas tree

Paypal buy now buttonCherub face, two girls, for Xmas decoration, Hand painted ceramic.  Measures about 2 ½” wide. #CER 69  $5.00

 

Hand painted figurines page 2

Gnome on a turtle hand painted

Gnome on a turtle

Gnome on a turtle hand painted figurine

Gnome on a turtle

Gnome leaping over turtle.  Completely handpainted and sealed for the outdoors.  He wants to go home with you.  You could hang your jewlery on him, or use him as a door prop.  9”tall x 5”wide x 7 1/2” deep.            #CER 18  $26.00  Paypal buy now button

Small hand painted ceramic lop earred rabbit figurine

Lop earred rabbit

Small white Lop earred rabbit, hand painted ceramic 4” x 3 1/2”  #CER 36  $8.00  Paypal buy now button

Ceramic hand painted Rabbit napkin holders

Rabbit napkin holder set ON SALE!!

Rabbit napkin holder set, Perfect for weddings and easter. Hand painted ceramic          3 1/2”long  x 3”tall x 1 1/2”wide.  #CER 38  $16.00 SALE (regular $24.00)  Paypal buy now button

Ceramic Santa with little girl and presents

Santa and friend

Santa with girl and sack of presents, Hand painted ceramic.  About 10″ tall.   Regularly $18.00      #CER 45  SALE PRICE $16.00    Paypal buy now button

 

Antique Jewelry repurposed page 1

Antique pin gold leaf

One of my Antique pins

I have a lot of ANTIQUE jewelry that is between 50 to 170 years old. Rhinestone, metallic, Mother of Pearl, Earrings, pins, pins that double as necklaces, bracelets, and it is all very very old.  It was owned by a relative and she put it in a trunk where it remained for about 30 years until her passing.  There was so much of it that no normal person could wear all of it unless they wore a piece each day for years.  Additionally, I also inherited antique buttons, military emblems and awards, and medallions of all kinds.

So I aked myself “Hey, you, if you wanted a nice piece of jewelry for yourself, what would you do with it?”  And me said that I’d just make something out of it.  So here I post for you some of the jewelry I made out of my antique parts.  I would wear them myself, but I don’t have ten or twenty bodies to wear it on.  It’s all very dressy and for sale.

I’ve also got many broken necklaces that are antique beads that someone strung on simple sewing thread, which rots in 75-100 years.  So if you bead a lot contact me for pictures of my beads. I might have some you’d like.  If you have a question as to the history of some of them just ask and I’ll post an article on it.

I also have superb unbroken antique jewelry all over the place, but I will be posting that elsewhere, probably on my website at www.jewelant.com

NOTE ON SHIPPING:  Currently I do not sell outside the United States, so shipping is for the U.S. only right now.  Later on I may change this, but for now that’s the deal.  If you wish to buy more than one item I can ship several small items for the same shipping price.  Over a certain weight or size the package size goes up and so does the shipping.

Antique Ornate silver cross with multi colored stones

Antique Ornate silver cross with multi colored stones

Large Silver toned metal cross necklace with five colored stones. 23’” silver tone chain. Measures about 3″ x 2′.  Late 1950’s to Early 1960’s  #JEW 02a  $16.00   Paypal buy now button

Antique enameled mauve and gold pendant with flowers

Antique enameled mauve and gold pendant with flowers

Antique Mauve enameled metal shell pendant full view

Antique enameled shell pendant full view

Antique Mauve enameled metal shell pendant and chain with gold edge, small yellow flower motif. Measures 1 ¼ x 1 1/2”, chain  23”  #JEW 03 $16.00             Paypal buy now button

Silver and green rhinestone pendant

Antique green rhinestone pendant with silver chain

antique silver necklace with green rhinestone pendant

Comes with decorative silver chain

Silver toned metal and green rhinestone pendant and necklace. Pendant measures 7/8” x 7/8”.  Silver toned chain 27” Late 1800’s to early 1900’s    #JEW 11  SOLD

I sold this one, but if you like green sparklies, I’ll list some of the other ones I have that are similar later this week.  I’ve also got a pin and earrings that are green rhinestones AND also are antique.

The Ripley Festival

To those of you that saw me at the Ripley Arts and Crafts Festival.  A big hug and hi how are ya!  If I seemed a bit scattered it was because I had a whole hours sleep before I got there.  Up all nite packing . . .

But if you saw anything there you wanted, or need a smaller size or a gift for birthdays or Christmas, you can get ahold of me through my email or this blog.  If you didn’t get a card with my contact information, it’s jewelant1@bellsouth.net.  Or leave as comment on this blog and I’ll get back to you.

Chickens don’t like unfamiliar things

Perching chick

I don’t LIKE new stuff

I had some white breadcrumbs that I put in the blender to take out to them, and went out to the chicken pen to give them to the hens. And I found something out quite by accident about my girls (the chickens).

I bent down to sprinkle some on the ground as I do every day with thiere regular crumbles.

They backed up.

I put some in my hand because they will eat directly from my hand with gusto.

They backed up again, looking upset. “Hey! that’s not food!”. They just did not TRUST those bread crumbs.

I finally got them to eat some by pecking with my finger at it like I always do.  The bread crumbs are lighter color than their crumbles.  But it taught me something about the discerning eye of a chicken.

And possibly the discerning eye of most people.  I know people that act that way about a new idea, a new food, a new thing they didn’t have experience with.  I just had to show them that it was good for them.

The Scaredy Cat beekeeper?

DO I HAVE BEEKEEPER PTSD?

After I recently got stung to pieces trying to capture a swarm in the wrong manner, all kinds of things went through my pea brain.  Kind of like a person that falls off or gets bucked off a horse, I was reluctant to do my normal bee routine. I was having trouble wanting to get back out there and tend to the remaining bees that I did have. Although I know that with my suit and gloves on, the chances of getting stung again were not really very likely.  And I always take great pains not to crush anyone.

But I had never in 5 years of owning bees gotten to really enjoying them.  I did not enjoy the fact that they really didn’t like my presence, and could act really hateful at the wrong moves.  Adding to the fact was that I had changed my bees from Russians, to two different other breeds.  One of these breeds was Italians, which did not seem to be very touchy.  The other breed was a mutt breed called “survivor bees” who seemed calm, but with no warning would explode into a rage.  I had never had any bees that temperamental.

My Russians would always head butt me before actually stinging, so I had some kind of warning.  But they were very swarmy, so I changed types last year.

Anyway, after the attack I was leery of bees, not terrified, but reluctant.  I knew I needed to tend to them, but I found all and any kind of excuse to put it off.  However, I did consider the idea at the last that aside from that reluctance, those survivor bees did seem to be a tad screwy.  And since I didn’t actually see them leave the hive in a swarm, I entertained the idea that possibly these were not my bees, but a feral bunch from somewhere else.  OR “Africanized bees”?????

 Bee guarding entrance to hive.

The culprits. Bee guarding entrance to hive.

But none of that explained that one hive in the back that was super touchy.

I thought possibly if I requeened all the screwy hives . . . And I also thought about selling all the darned bees, because what good is it having them if you don’t maintain them?  I didn’t mind having a few hives (2 or three), but six was a maintenance thing if you didn’t really love it.

Hey, here I am posting umpteen articles on how to take care of bees, and I didn’t even feel comfortable around them enough to want to keep them any more.  I opologize profusely.  But it is the trooooooooth.  I can stand sitting in a chair in front of the hive without fear at all.  But I put on that bee suit, and I know the bees will like me up until the point that I remove some frames.  Then they just lose it.  I keep going, but they are pissed and I do not enjoy them being pissed at me.  I guess I just want my animals to like me because I take so much care taking care of them.

Finger stung by bee

Finger sting

It’s not as if I’m terrified, or in fear of my life or anything.  I know that it isn’t personal. I know the bees don’t hate me personally, or even all people personally.

Bee stung eye

My eye . . . swollen up

I think I need a beekeeper shrink . . .
——————————————————-
But now for my other reaction

I got up the morning after writing the above article.  I was not even awake, with bleary eyes, cricked neck, and another thought coming into my not yet awake mind.  Here I am spending my hard earned money on beehives, frames, beetle traps, time out of my life, etc.  So I resolved to look at this in the opposite way for once.

    • They cost me over $100 each. x6 = $600
    • Their hives cost about $150 each. x6 = $900
    • The beetle traps cost at least half that each. x6 = $300
    • The extra supers cost a certain amount.
    • Extra excluders cost a certain amount.
    • Powdered sugar for shaking, and miscellaneous equipment probably cost at least $100
    • A SMALL spinner for spinning frames of honey cost $120.
    • Maintenance averages 2 weeks a year. That equals 5-6 months out of my life. Which is equal to a large vacation.
    • I worry over the parasites that attack them.
    • I have to go out in the cold and make sure they don’t freeze to death or starve.
    • I have to go out in a hot bee suit and sweat over them while they try to kill me.
    • Bee stings make me itch and dig my skin off for at least a week.

And the bad possiblities . . .

    • They are in MY backyard.
    • They are bought and paid for by me.
    • They are taken care of with time out of my valuable life.
    • I only ask for PART of their food, which is extra they won’t use.
    • They live at my discretion.
    • The beetles would get them if I didn’t do something about it each year.
    • They could have gone to someone that bangs on their hive.
    • They could have gone to someone that likes to smash bees.
    • They could have gone to someone that puts poison in their hives.
    • They would just act like bees and die a like a bee if I didn’t take care of them.

So, who cares if the bees actually LIKE me?

The perks used to be getting to watch bees and observe their many ups and downs.  And HONEY, the main thing that is not replaceable by getting it at the grocery store in the same manner.  The honey is storable for very long periods of time, tastes great, make great gifts and can be sold.  You can actually stockpile it, put it in your coffee, tea, cook with it, etc.

Well, they are insects.  And in their little pea brains I probably should not expect any more than that.  And I’m sure I wouldn’t get a heck of a lot of money if I sold them.  And that would also mean having some inspector running around my yard telling me what I already knew in the first place, which is that I have a few small hive beetles. Yeek.

So, I’m back to square one.  I need to get out there today and fix those hives so they’ll survive some more and see if they have any extra honey after swarming all over the place.  Anyone have one of these epiphanies?

Hiding under the blanket

Do you ever feel this way?

hiding under a blanket

I ain’t coming out

This was taken this winter when the pipes froze up in the house.  I had to get under there and fix them, and this is how I felt.  Anyone else have a day (week) like that?

For the Moms you knew

Chicken wall hanging

Moms Chicken

Mom was always doing art and artsy stuff. When I was very young, one day she started a project that always puzzled me, because she slaved and worried over it so strenuously.  And this is how it started.

She got out some wax paper, Elmers Glue, sawdust, a big bowl, some tools, and started mixing the glue with the sawdust. She drew out this chicken on the wax paper and then with the glue/sawdust mixture she proceeded to make a flat but bas relief chicken on the wax paper.

She fussed, she cussed, she just couldn’t get it right.  But when it was finished and dried out, it looked like the chicken in the picture above.  Well, it didn’t hold together very well.  It broke in all the small places like the feathers.  But I remember it so vividly because it seemed so important to her.  I didn’t try to figure it out then, but now I know what it all means.

See, when my mother died I inherited all of Grandmas stuff that SHE inherited.  And one of the things that I got was this cast iron chicken.  I had never seen the actual thing, I just experienced my Mom trying to make a chicken.  But now I know that it was her Moms chicken, and it meant a whole lot to her.

So this chicken has a place of great honor in my kitchen now. You just never know the history of things sometimes except by accident. If someone had thrown it out, I might never have known.

It was a very special light bulb moment when I “got it”

Nick Nack Paddy Wack Photos

I have been meaning to post these.  I collect wierd stuff, but I like it.

Cool Dog ceramic

This is one COOL dog

Christmas light

My night light

Camel figurine

This Camel that looks at me all the time

Figurines and Nick Nacks

Real Nick Nacks

Santa figurine

I painted this one

Figurines and Nick Nacks

Real Nick Nacks 2

antique Cat pepper shaker

I am PEP. And I need hugs.

New design for my website header

I first want to thank Andrew Zhebrakov of http://www.icojam.com for letting me use the Maneki Neko iconset to use in my designs.  He designed the cat, and I just incorporated it into my design.  He is really very good at what he does.  And I really like Maneki Neko cats.  I will do an article on their history later.

NOTE: Recently I had to take the site down for security reasons.  Lots of spammers and such.  But I’m working on getting it back up soon.  I’ll post here when it’s ready.  I had to really figure that one out, not being a professional person (grin)

Jewelant.com artwork for header

Jewlant.com new header

HONEY BEE and HONEY FACTS 2

Cartoon of Bees and a flower c1981

Bees and Flower MY FLOWER!

Honey bees can gather the nectar in more than 300 flower types in the United States.

A honey bee must tap 2 million flowers to make 1 pound of honey.

The average worker honey bee makes 1 1/2 teaspoon of honey in her lifetime.

A honey bee visits between 50-100 flowers during one collection trip.

To make one pound of honey, honey bees must gather 10 pounds of nectar.

Honey has a tendency to granulate due to its natural properties. Granulation does not affect the taste or purity of honey.

Granulated honey can be restored to liquid form by carefully placing the jar in a pan of very warm water. (not too hot, cause that can ruin the taste and the vitamins and enzymes)

Store your honey in a dry cupboard. Do not refrigerate honey. Cold temperatures hasten granulation.

Honey does not benefit from pasteurization because it is naturally low in bacteria and other microbes.

Honey contains no fat, no cholesterol, no gluten and no sulfates or sulfites.

Honey is primarily composed of carbohydrates.

Honey is a natural sugar and is easier to digest. Honey is 100% pure and natural. It is made entirely by honeybees from flower nectars.

For all inquiries regarding the use of honey in medical conditions such as diabetes, weight control, etc., please consult your physician.

Honey was found in the tomb of King Tut (fl. c.1350 , king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty) and was still edible since honey never spoils.

Due to the high level of fructose, honey is 25% sweeter than table sugar.

Honey is created by honey bees who mix plant nectar, with their own bee enzymes and then evaporate excess water.

Honey has different flavors and colors, depending on the location and kinds of flowers the bees visit.

To the ancients, honey was a source of health, a sign of purity and a symbol of strength and virility.

Nectar can contain 80 percent water, which the bees fan with their wings to evaporate most of.

Honey is antiseptic, antibiotic, and acidic

Natural honey will form into granular sugars

Honey can be used as a preservative

Honey can be used as a sugar substitute

Honey can be used as a facial beauty mask

Honey is used by some people for allergies.  But supposedly only honey from your local sources

NOTE – I understand from hearing from other sources that honey should not be fed to children under the age of 12 months.  I’ll research this further.

HONEY BEE FACTS 1

Bee Family cartoon copyright 1981

Bee Family and Baby Bee

HONEY BEES ARE NOT NATIVE TO THE UNITED STATES
They were imported by Europeans in the early 1600’s to America.  But they are native to many other parts of the world, including the Middle East.  For over 150 million years they have been making honey all over the world.

HONEY BEES ARE VEGETARIAN
They eat honey, pollen, nectar, and royal jelly.  Wasps, hornets, and yellow jackets are carnivorous, and eat other insects.  They also are a lot more touchy and stingy.

BEE VENOM is acidic.  Wasp, hornets and the like have alkaline venom.  It still hurts no matter . . .

HONEY BEES AREN’T MEAN
They protect their food, queen, babies, and home from predators.  Foraging and swarming bees aren’t apt to sting unless you bother or step on them.  If you make them angry they will normally only chase you about 50 feet. Bees on or in a hive will guard and protect the hive and their family, and they post guard bees for this purpose.  The hive contains their young and the queen, and also all the food they have stored over the summer to feed them in winter.  Without any of those they would not survive.  I think I’d protect that!

HONEY BEES DIE AFTER STINGING PEOPLE – BUT . . .
When they sting and die they give off a smell that alerts other bees that an enemy is around.  They are much more likely to attack and sting if they smell this.  Don’t squish bees, they take it personally.

HONEY BEES LIVE FOR 60 DAYS  Except queens, who live much longer I remember someone saying about three times as long as the workers.  Although I have heard the queen can live for up to three years, I cannot confirm that as of today.  Let me know if you know the answer to that.

HONEY BEES HAVE ONE QUEEN (unless another is born)
There can be only one.  If any more are born they have a big fight to the death or one leaves. She can lay over 1500 eggs a day.  Worker bees create new queens by feeding the larvae Royal Jelly, which they produce from special bee glands.

WORKER HONEY BEES ARE FEMALE
Male bees don’t do much work at all, except to date the queen for a short while. In fact they get tossed out of the hive before winter so they won’t eat all the food.  But spring more hatch out.

MALE HONEY BEES HAVE NO STINGERS
Yep, that’s right.  You can pick them up with your bare hands and they won’t sting you.  If you can dodge the guard bees while you’re doing it.  They are called DRONES.

HONEY BEES HAVE TWO STOMACHS     (One of them is for nectar and honey)

HONEY BEES HAVE FIVE EYES
They can see ultraviolet light, and red is seen as dark brown or black.  The eyes also have tiny hairs that can detect wind speed and direction.  Some of those eyes are in the top of their heads.

HONEY BEES HAVE FOUR WINGS
Their wings beat over 11,000 times a minute. And they can fly 15 miles an hour.  But if you are being chased you will swear it’s 90 miles an hour.

HONEY BEES HAVE THREE PAIRS OF LEGS
Their legs are used to walk, grasp, clean their antenna (or doorstep, or other bees), carry pollen or propolis (resins from plants they use to close crack in their hives)

A HONEY BEES ANTENNAS
A Honey Bees antenna have sensors that detect odors.  In 2003 some bees were trained by researchers to associate the smell of explosives with food, therefore being able to detect bombs.

HONEY BEES BREATH THROUGH THIER ABDOMENS (stomachs)
This is also why they are so easily poisoned by pesticides.  And why dusty stuff irritates them.  I even feel sheepish using my smoker on them, and do it sparingly.  Sometimes I don’t have to use one.  Sometimes it’s not advisable to use one.  But whenever I omit to bring it to the hives, I always end up going back to get it.  Such as when I accidentally squish a bee or two.  They hate that.  Well, it is murder, even if accidental.

HONEY BEES PRODUCE WAX FROM THEIR BODIES
They exude (push it out) of their abdomens (belly) in flakes.  Then they take the flakes and form them into hexagon shaped cells with their little jaws and legs.  It takes approximately 450,000 of those flakes to make one pound of wax.  I’ve never actually seen them make wax, but I’ve seen pictures.

HONEY BEES ARE AWAKE IN THE WINTER
They huddle together around the queen to keep her warm eating honey for energy.  They need about 70 pounds of honey to survive the winter, and if they run out of honey, they freeze and die.  This is why sometimes beekeepers feed them in the winter if they don’t have enough honey.

HONEY BEES POLLINATE THE FOOD WE EAT
They make help make food for us when they gather pollen and nectar and go from flower to flower.  This places pollen from one plant to another, and fertilizes the plants.  Plants can then make fruit and seeds.

SEYMOUR SIMONS Co-writer of the song “All Of You”

SEYMOUR SIMONS, GERALD MARKS, “ALL OF ME”, THE BLACKHAWK RESTURANT

Seymour Simons  was born  January 14, 1896, Detroit Michigan.  He died on  Feb. 12, 1949 Detroit, Michigan University of Michigan – bachelor of science degree.  US Air Force – second lieutenant World War I.  Detroit Michigan, well known as a pianist, composer and orchestra leader. 1920’s – wrote material for various performers such as Nora Bayes and Elsie Janis 1928-1932   radio production & booking business Early 30’s – had his own orchestra playing for radio stations

Some of his song titles were:  “Once In A Lifetime,” “It’s The Little Things That Count,”  “Breezin’ Along With The Breeze,  “I’m Just Beginning To Care,” “Sweetheart Of My Student Days,”  and his most famous song, “All Of Me,” co-written with Gerald Marks which came out in 1931

Photo of Seymour Simons postcard

Seymour Simons Postcard, originally signed by him.

All Of Me (The lyrics to)  Written by Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks
All of me
Why not take all of me
Can’t you see
I’m no good without you
Take my lips
I never use them
Take my arms
I want to loose them
Your goodbye left me with eyes that cry
How can I go on dear without you
You took the part that once was my heart
So why not take all of me

All of me
Why not take all of me
Can’t you see
I’m no good without you
Take my lips
I want to loose them
Take my heart
I’ll never use them
Your goodbye left me with eyes that cry
How can I go on dear without you
You took the part that once was my heart
So why not take all of meI

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THE BLACKHAWK 

A dance band nightclub that broadcast over live radio the sounds of the big bands and singers of those times.  (From 1920’s to 1984 or the present) It is presently also a resturant.  Some of the  performers there over the years were:

Gerald Marks
Seymour Simons
Coon-Sanders and the Kansas City Nighthawks
Ish Kabibble
Ben Pollack and his Orchestra
Ginny Simms
Skinnay Ennis (Got A Date With an Angel)
Perry Como
Kay Kyser and his orchestra   Kay Kyser
Ralph Ginsburg
Bob Crosby and the Bob Cats (Bill Crosby’s brother)
Herbie Kay
Ted Weems and his Orchestra featured Elmo Tanner
Chico Marx and his Orchestra (Harpo Marx’s brother)
Saxie Dowell
Ben Pollack and his orchestra
Chuck Foster
Benny Goodman and Glenn Miller
Harry Cool
Hal Kemp and his orchestra
Del Courtney
Deane Janice & Maxine Gray
Al Trace
Louis Prima and his orchestra
Eddy Howard
Jan Garber and his orchestra
Ozzy Nelson
Jack Teagarden and his orchestra
Will Osborne
Les Brown and his Band of Renown
Joe Sanders
Chico Marx and his orchestra with Mel Torme
Art Kassell & here
Teddy Powell
Dick Shelton
Dick Stabile
Blue Barron
Ted Fio Rito (or Ted Fiorito, FioRito)
Bob Haggart

HISTORY OF THE US 81st Division (Wildcat Division)

World War One and THE 81ST WILDCAT DIVISION (And information of the 316th)

The United States Army’s 81st Division was first comprised of men that were drafted from Florida, North Carolina, and South Carolina on September 5, 1917. Theire first title was the “Stonewall Division” in honor of Confederate General T J. Jackson. Later they were renamed the “Wildcat Division.” The wildcat shoulder patch was adopted, and was the first insignia worn by troops in the American Expeditionary Force (AEF).  I am still editing this post, and will include links to patches and history when I get the time.

photo of 316th Wildcats patch

photo of 316th Wildcats patch

The division was organized near Columbia South Carolina at Camp Jackson. 

It was one of the first national army divisions to be organized. In May 1918 the 81st Division was sent to Camp Sevier, near Greenville, South Carolina, and in July 1918 it was sent to New York to be shipped overseas.  August 1918 the 81st Division went to England then to France to fight the Germans.

The division was sent to the American 1st Army on October 19, 1918, and November entered the front lines.  After the war the 81st Division remained in France for more than five months.  The men were shipped back to the United States in early June 1919 and discharged from service.

REACTIVATON OF THE 81ST DIVISION

The 81st Division was reactivated on June 15th 1942.   It was overseas July 3rd, 1944, and after 166 days of combat inactivated on January 30th, 1946 in Japan.  Campaigns were in the Western Pacific, & South Philippines.

=======================================================

81st Division – Primary Units

161st Infantry Brigade:
321st Infantry Regiment
322d Infantry Regiment
317th Machine Gun Battalion

162d Infantry Brigade:
323d Infantry Regiment
324th Infantry Regiment
318th Machine Gun Battalion

156th Field Artillery Brigade:
316th Field Artillery Regiment (155mm)
(These are the guys in  the pictures above)
317th Field Artillery Regiment (75mm)
318th Field Artillery Regiment (75mm)
306th Trench Mortar Battery

Divisional Troops:
316th Machine Gun Battalion
306th Engineer Regiment
306th Field Signal Battalion
306th Train Headquarters and MP
306th Ammunition Train
306th Supply Train
306th Engineer Train
306th Sanitary Train (Ambulance Companies &
Field Hospitals 321, 322, 323, 324)

Insignia of the Wildcat Division  – The cat is in different colors, according to the brigade
BLACK – Headquarters, Machine Gun Battalion, and Engineers
WHITE – One Hundred and Sixty-first Infantry Brigade
LIGHT BLUE – One Hundred and Sixty-second Infantry Brigade
RED – One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Field Artillery Brigade and Ammunition Train
BUFF – Field Signal Battalion, orange; Sanitary Train, green, and Supply Train

Commanders of the 81st Division during World War One
Brig. Gen. Charles H. Barth      August 28th, 1917
Maj. Gen. Charles J. Bailey      October 8th, 1917
Brig. Gen. Charles H. Barth      November 24th, 1917
Brig. Gen. G.W. McIver           December 28th, 1917
Maj. Gen. Charles J. Bailey       March 11th, 1918
Brig. Gen. G.W. McIver           May 19th, 1918
Brig. Gen. Munroe McFarland   May 24th, 1918
Maj. Gen. Charles J. Bailey       May 30th, 1918
Brig. Gen. G.W. McIver           June 9th, 1918
Maj. Gen. Charles J. Bailey       July 3rd, 1918

Commanders of the 81st Division during World War Two
Maj. Gen. Gustave H. Franke (June-August 1942)
Maj. Gen. Paul J. Mueller (August 1942 to inactivation)

WORLD WAR ONE – 316th Field Artillery

 Newport News, VA after the end of World War One

Photo of World War 1 panorama 316th Field Artillery

World War One photo 316th F.A. A.E.F Jun 10th, 1919 Size: 8″ x 47″

“F.A.” stands for Field Artillery, and “A.E.F.” stands for American Expeditionary Forces.  Photo by Halliday Photo  On the photograph it is listed as “Photo #3917” These photos were taken at Newport News, Virginia on June 10th 1919, which was at the end of World War One when the soldiers were ready to be discharged from the Army.

All my research identifies these men as the “Fighting Wildcats” of the US Army’s 81st Division. First named the “Stonewall” Division, later nicknamed the “Wildcat Division”.  Their slogan was “Wildcats Never Quit”.  And their shoulder patch was a wildcat.

photo of 316th Wildcats patch

photo of 316th Wildcats patch

World War One – Bat. “D” 316 F.A. (Field Artillery) A.E.F  (American Expeditionary Forces)

This photograph says at the bottom Battery (or Battalion) “D” The 316th Field Artillery, The American Expeditionary Forces.  Photo taken by Halliday Photo at Newport News, Virginia.  On the photograph it is listed as “Photo # 3927″  Size: 8″ x 26”

photo of World War One 316th Field Artillery panorama

Antique panorama of World War One 316th Field Artillery

SEE ALSO: HISTORY OF THE US 81st Division (Wildcat Division) Which I will post after this one.
You can see a larger version of both of these photos on http://www.jewelantique.com/PhotographicPage1.html

Artist Tsugouharu Foujita, 1886-1968

Foujita prints
Foujita was a Japanese Artist that moved to France and practised art there during the 1900’s.  He did a lot of cat prints and other things.  More history later . . . But in the meantime, here are some links to information on this artist, which will give you some background.  I have these on my wall at home.  Anyone have questions about them, just let me know.

Image

Image

WIKIPEDIA http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsuguharu_Foujita

William Weston Gallery  http://www.williamweston.co.uk/pages/previous/single/24/161/1.html

YOGA CAT LIKES HIS UNDERWEAR

Cat with underwear on his head

Yoga cat likes his underwear

YOGA YOWIE IS AT IT AGAIN!

cat on back, yoga cat

Cat surfing can be hard if you are less than yoga FIT

Yowie yoga cat career continues . . .  He is now deeply getting into . . . SURFING!  (He always did like the Beach Boys)

Yoga Cat asks for his bath

cat in bathtub

Yoga cat is dirty . . .

Yowie hangs out here in the bathtub. If he can’t get me to give him a bath,then he diddles in the water while I take one myself.

HIVE BEETLES KILLED LAST HIVE

dead bee from hive beetles

Rest in peace my girls . . .

Well, it finally happened.  I lost the last hive I had.  It was weak anyways, and ultimately didn’t make a queen in time to make babies and store enough honey.  But to add insult to injury, the robber bees that ended up dealing the last blow were probably from a previous hive of mine that had swarmed.  Big, healthy bees that came back to get the last honey.

HOWEVER, all is not totally lost, because I’ve read that hive beetles can’t survive outside the hive in the winter.  That they need the warmth of a huddle of bees to keep them warm.  So, anyone know anything about this last bastion?  If it’s true, then possibly my bees didn’t die in vain.  Possibly when I get my new order of Russians, they will be able to start new without any outside varmints to eat them alive . . . We will see.

HiHowAreYa

 

Welcome to Jewelant’s Blog!  It’s a blog about all my interests and anything other interesting.  Got cats, videos, honey bee information, garden pictures, cartoons, militaria, antiques, chickens, and funny stuff. This blog has evolved to encompass hobbies I’m presently messing with, and things I have to do with, and, and, and, whatever pops up in the future.

 

 

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